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How to Replace Rear Speakers Honda Civic

Upgrading standard rear speakers to 6x9

Written By on in Cars & Bikes

732 words, estimated reading time 4 minutes.

Here is a quick guide to on how to replace rear speakers in a 1996 Honda Civic Coupe with pictures. The process may or may not be the same for 1992-1995 models, I have not seen one for comparison.

If you have a Civic and like listening to music, you can't fail to notice how poor the factory speakers are, and if you looked at the coupe speakers your probably asking how to change the rear speakers? I know I was - and when you read this you will probably think "there has to be an easier way!". Well, there isn't, not without damaging the interior trim anyway. This is a big thumbs down to Honda's design team, though they probably had a good reason for doing it this way (I hope!).

Please do not be put off by this, it really is easy when you know how and the results from quality speakers are well worth the effort.

Standard Disclaimer: The instructions given below are intended as guidelines only. Any dismantling of your vehicle you do yourself, and the author of this document cannot and does not accept any responsibility for any damage incurred by you dismantling or refitting components incorrectly.

Tools Required:

  • 10mm Socket
  • 12mm Socket
  • 14mm Socket
  • Phillips Screwdriver

Removing the Rear Seats

Know your enemy: Rear seats have a 40/60 split and can fold down to make room for luggage but to get to the speakers they have to come out... Fold down both seats and unclip the carpet trim from the back (just pull the carpet and the clips should pop out). Yep, that's my big subwoofer.

You need to unbolt the 4 10mm bolts holding the 40 seat in place, you can then pull it towards you and out. Also, do the two bolts holding in the 60 split seat. Next, you need to unbolt the 10mm bolt on the right, then the 12mm on the left. Keep the bolts and brackets safe. When they are undone, the 60 split seat should be able to come out.

There is another 12mm bolt on this bracket. Towards the centre of the seat is another 10mm bolt holding the lower seat in. Undo this and the seat should lift up from the back and unclip from the front. Now the seats are out, nearly there.

Removal of Seat Belt Restraint

...Well, actually I lied, were not half way yet! You need to loosen the right-hand bolt (closest to the front seats) and undo the rear one. They were 14mm bolts on mine. Do both sides of the car.

Remove Interior Trim

Should have something like this. Undo the Phillips screw in each rear panel.

The panels should unclip from the door frame and come out quite easily. The plastic cover on the parcel shelf (rear deck) should now unclip at the front to allow you to lift and pop the other clips. It will then come out.

Replace Rear Speakers

You can now unclip and unscrew the old speakers and drop in your new ones. I'm putting in my Kenwood KFC9605 speakers. Make sure that they work and you are happy with them before you reassemble the car, you don't want to be doing this again in a hurry!!

Reassembly

Reassembly of the car is the reverse of the above process.

Just watch out on the 60 split seat, make sure you put the hinge in the bearing before you bolt it down!

Please, please, please make sure you torque everything properly, most importantly the seat belts. I cannot stress how important this is.

According to the Haynes manual for the 1995-2000 Civic, all seatbelt fastenings (buckle bolts, reel bolt and pretensions) should be torqued down to 32Nm or 24 lbf ft.

If you are in any doubt, please get a qualified professional to check. I will not be held accountable if this is done incorrectly.

That is it all done, now turn up the volume and enjoy your new setup! For best results, consider upgrading the front speakers as well (you can just pop the fascia off and unscrew those!) and upgrade the radio head unit if you haven't already.

Last updated on: Saturday 17th June 2017

 

Comments
Andy Miles

Andy Miles

Good instructions. A couple of tips. If you remove one side, the top part can slip out to that side, thus saving the removal of the other side and putting it back in.

Reply to Andy Miles

 

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